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Ten Essentials for a Highly Engaged Sales Meetings Part II

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Corporate Sales Retreats

One of the most successful companies to keep an eye on in 2012 is undoubtedly Green Mountain Coffee Roasters.  Not only do they make the best coffee on the planet, they do it in a socially responsible way, including making an enormous difference in the lives of the coffee growers and their communities.  Don’t be fooled by games in the stock market – keep an eye on their fundamentals.

I was asked to help them (for the sixth year) prepare for their annual sales meeting and I wanted to share some of the lessons learned over the last few years with them and other clients planning large meetings.

 

 Ten Essentials for a Highly Engaged Sales Meeting: 4-6

4.      Inspiration Salespeople love to be motivated.  Most of them are competitive by nature (get that bonus!…) and they like to have the aspirational expectations laid out for them.  Where are the goal posts?  What constitutes a home run?  Sadly, most organizations limit the stated objectives to traditional metrics like sales volume, product shipped, market share and penetration.  While these are all legitimate metrics, and while they are critical indicators of profitability, they barely touch the depth of natural human desires for success, security, and connection.  And when the traditional metrics suffer in economic downturns, all the players are left with are falling indicators and apparent failure.

 5.      Interaction We are social animals.  We need to connect with each other.  This is especially true for people in sales. Just look how popular the networking opportunities are at these events.  Organizers would be wise to include lots of time for socializing – and if you can do it in creative ways (i.e., a scavenger hunt for examples of core values, product attributes, contests, etc.), then all the better.

6.      Validation We all wake up every morning is search of validation.  We like to know how we are doing, how we stand against our peers, how we measure up.  With validation we feel safer, more secure, and less defensive (or “defended” as therapists might say).  We rarely get enough of it, so any time it is offered (especially in an authentic, sincere way) the audience will feel better and the level of emotional engagement goes up.

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Don Rheem’s presentation on Employee Engagement gets underneath the real “whys” on the behavior of discretionary effort. I found his examples to be relative and understandable. I see how our leaders are making better connections with the hearts of our people, so everyone better understands the goals of the enterprise.

--Peter Rittenhouse, Director of Supply Chain
Nestle Waters
 
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